Jeremy Ouellette, Ph.D.

Jeremy joined the Vermont Tech faculty in 2012 following a stint as a postdoctoral fellow at Dartmouth College’s Thayer School of Engineering where he studied the impact of the solar wind on Earth’s magnetic field using global-scale computer simulations. He also has industry experience as a systems engineer for Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, testing and developing software for missile defense radars.

His primary areas of instruction are introductory programming, software engineering, software quality assurance, and game physics engine design. He especially enjoys supervising project courses where he can help students take ideas from concept to finished product.

Jeremy Ouellette, PhD, has been teaching at Vermont Tech for five years. His primary areas of instruction are introductory programming, software engineering, software quality assurance, and game physics engine design. His teaching philosophy is to spend less time on lecturing and more with hands-on instruction. He especially likes project-based courses where he can help students take ideas from concept to finish.
  • School

    Engineering and Computing

  • Role

    Assistant Professor & Department Co-Chair

  • Department(s)

  • Degrees

    BS, St. Lawrence University; Ph.D., Dartmouth College

  • Phone

    (802) 728-1490

  • Email

    jouellette2@vtc.edu

  • Respect in the Workplace

    In the workplace, Jeremy thinks a respectful work environment is one built on trust. When people trust each other and each other’s professionalism, he thinks that trust shows respect. Jeremy feels he shows respect for his colleagues when he operates from the assumption that everyone is working toward the same goal. He uses that as motivation to be helpful to his colleagues when asked to take on a responsibility, even if that help is to find another person more able to take on the work. Another signal of respect is when coworkers are sensitive to the language they use and don’t gender tasks unnecessarily. Jeremy also values when he gets feedback that addresses any unconscious bias on his part. He feels it gives him the opportunity to be mindful, modify his behavior and reduce his impact on gender inequality.
  • Respect and Appreciation

    Jeremy benefits from the faculty evaluation process in that is provides a lot of feedback to help him assess his impact on others. Students report how caring Jeremy is about them learning the material. In addition to appreciating the student feedback, Jeremy also feels respected and appreciated when coworkers take the time to say he’s doing a good job or that they value his approach.
  • Supervisor Modeling Respectful Behavior

    Jeremy feels that the reappointment process letter and feedback in fair and well thought out. If an issue of concern has even been raised, it was done so kindly and with a collaborative attitude to include Jeremy’s input. Those experiences have modeled respectful behavior in Jeremy’s eyes.