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History (HIS)

HIS 1111  World History I  (3)                                                                        as required
This course serves as an introduction to world civilizations: Mediterranean, European, Asian, American, and African. Study includes origins of the time of global expansion of civilizations; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None

HIS 1112  World History II (3)                                                                       as required
This course serves as an introduction to world civilizations from 1500 through the present: European, Asian, African, and American. Study includes origins of the time of global expansion of civilizations and the modern evolution of world powers and world problems; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None

HIS 1211  American History I  (3)                                                                as required
In the course, students survey major historical events as they affected the lives of the American people. Emphasis in the course is placed on the changes in institutions, values, and lifestyles that characterized the evolution of our society from a colonial, agrarian culture to that of a unified, democratic republic; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None

HIS 1212  American History II  (3)                                                                 as required
Students examine the historical roots of American society as an urbanized, technological culture and consider the problems and solutions generated by such a culture. Students also study the evolution of the US in foreign affairs to its present status; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None

HIS 1220  Native American Histories and Culture  (3)                              as required
This is an interdisciplinary course exploring indigenous cultures of North America. Students will consider the pre-Columbian world; history of contacts between natives and settlers; and contemporary issues including legal sovereignty, land claim, resource policy, poverty, and cultural autonomy; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None

HIS 1260  Information Technology: Past, Present, and Future  (3)                       fall
This course covers the history of computing from early mechanical devices; theoretical milestones; electronic computers of the late 1940s and 1950s; generational changes in architecture; underlying technologies; the progression from main frames to minicomputers, supercomputers, microcomputers, and embedded computers; and networking. Introductory societal and/or ethical issues, such as the digital divide, encryption, peer-to-peer file sharing, and computers and homeland security are also covered. Further focus is placed on organizational and human forces shaping the adoption of information technology and the difficulties that may be experienced during a systems implementation, a change of systems, and the impacts of computer technology on employment, health, and the community. It concludes with various trends and forces shaping information technology and probable changes that will occur from a futurist perspective. Topics include recent new technologies and their effect on people and society; basic concepts of future studies; and the application of future studies to make a prediction regarding new technologies; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS  [for non-computer majors]) Prerequisite: None

HIS 2070  Vermont History (3)                                                                       as required
This course surveys the history of Vermont from early days to the present. Students explore economic, political, social, and cultural themes with a focus on what makes this region unique; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent

HIS 2150  History of the US in the Sixties  (3)                                           as required
This course explores the movements and events of the US during one of the most tumultuous decades: the 1960s. Through documentary films and other media, readings, websites, and discussion, students will study such topics as the civil rights movement, assassination, the student movement, the impact of the Vietnam War, and the music, art, and literature that are the hallmarks of a decade marked by social activism and political and cultural upheaval. Through individual and group reading, study, and presentation, students will learn of the continuation of the environmental, womenís, and civil rights movements. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent

HIS 2270  Society and Environment in History (3)                                   as required
This course provides an exploration of the response to environmental challenges by various societies in history and why societies fail and perish or succeed and survive. The course will consider social and cultural adaptation to environmental conditions and challenges and will analyze the relationship and interaction between society and environment in the development of sustainable communities. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent

HIS 2660  European Classroom  (3)                                                                           fall
This course will immerse students in the art, history, and architecture of a foreign city through participation in intensive coursework combined with the experience of a guided travel tour to Europe. The course will use visual perception and critical analysis to study the interconnected fields while expanding student learning by facilitating experience of works of art and architecture first hand. It will reinforce each studentís understanding of topics in the history, culture, art, and architecture of the target city. This is a cultural experience intended to enrich and broaden student perspectives in our increasingly global world; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: ENG 1061 and instructor permission [Course fee: TBA]

HIS 3165  Vermont History and Government (3)                                       as required
This course provides a close look at Vermontís historical, social, and economic development, its problems as a republic, the struggle for statehood, and its constitution and government today. The instruction observes Vermontís place in American civilization from its inventive, cultural, educational, literary, and political contributions; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent, junior standing or instructor permission