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Biological Sciences (BIO)

BIO 1020  Introduction to Environmental Biology  (4)                                            fall
This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of environmental biology. It is an introduction to the structure and biota of several aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and students investigate why species occupy specific habitats. The course includes an introduction to Vermontís aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; spatial and temporal changes in ecosystems and species; critical observation; and interpretation of landscapes. The course will stress communication skills, as well as critical thinking and teamwork; 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: None

BIO 1030  Nutrition  (3)                                                                                                fall
The course focus is to provide sound, relevant background knowledge in the science of human nutrition and to translate the scientific principles of nutrition into applicable concepts of care. The course offers opportunities for the student to identify dietary modifications relating to the developmental stage of the patient. It implements the philosophy and objectives of the nursing and allied health programs by identifying the role of adequate nutrition in maintaining the health of the individual throughout the life-span; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: None

BIO 1220  Botany  (4)                                                                                             spring
This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of plant growth and development. Higher plant structure, metabolism, growth regulators, and mineral nutrition are emphasized. Students also become acquainted with the diversity of plants and plant-like organisms through study of bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi, mosses, and lower vascular plants; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week.  Prerequisite: None

BIO 1330  Introduction to Occupational Physiology & Psychology  (3)        spring
In order to safely operate vehicles or equipment, or to perform in occupations which routinely places physical or mental stress demands on a person, a professional needs to develop an awareness of not only the physiological aspects of the job, but also those that influence workload and fatigue, decision making, and situational awareness. In this course, students will study how the mind and body interact with workplace operations and how to deal with situational or operational risk factors. This course is particularly critical for the health and safety of people who are in or learning about occupations that require them to engage with machines, vehicles, or potentially dangerous operations. A key focal point of the course is on responsible self-assessment of oneís readiness and ability to safely engage in occupational activities in This course is just the beginning of what should be a lifelong focus area in their profession; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Matriculation or experience in a specific field of study or instructor permission Corequisite: Enrollment in applied field of study

BIO 2011  Human Anatomy & Physiology I  (4)           fall
This course is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body. It emphasizes the properties of cells, tissues, and organ systems and their relationships in health and disease. Topics include general body organization and function; cellular physiology and histology; and the anatomy and physiology of each organ system. Laboratory work parallels lecture topics and includes microscopy, study of human anatomical models, dissection of appropriate laboratory specimens, and physiologic experimentation; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week.  Prerequisite: None

BIO 2012  Human Anatomy & Physiology II  (4)                                     spring/winter
A continuation of BIO 2011, this portion of the course includes the study of the structure and function of the endocrine system, circulatory system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, excretory system, and reproductive system. Other topics covered include acid/base balance and electrolyte balance. Laboratory work parallels lecture topics and includes microscopy, dissection of appropriate laboratory specimens, and study of human anatomical models; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 2011

BIO 2030  Plant Pathology  (3)                                                                              spring
Students explore the organisms and environmental factors that cause plant diseases. The biology of fungi, bacteria, and viruses, including their life histories, is studied extensively. A systematic approach to discovery and identification of plant disease is examined. Students learn to recognize disease symptoms. All methods of management are covered, but more emphasis is placed on preventative techniques; 2 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 2040 or instructor permission

BIO 2040  Entomology & Ecological Pest Management (3)                                        fall
Entomology examines the biology and management of insect and other related invertebrate pests that attack ornamental plants. Students study insect morphology, anatomy, life processes, and ecology. Special emphasis is placed on insect identification and life histories. Students explore management strategies as part of an integrated approach to pest management; 2 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or instructor permission

BIO 2120  Elements of Microbiology  (4)                                      fall/spring/summer
This course offers the student an opportunity to examine organisms that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. This is a comprehensive study of the basic principles of microbiology. A brief survey of the history of the science is given. Emphasis is placed on understanding the variety and differences of microbes and their relationship to humans. Virtual laboratory study and in-laboratory demonstrations complement the lecture. Successful completion of the laboratory exercises is a partial requirement for the course; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 2012 recommended

BIO 2320  Zoology  (4)                                                                                                 fall 
A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental concepts of animal biology, including molecular genetics and inheritance, evolution, and biological systems, with an emphasis on vertebrates. Previous successful completion of courses in biology and chemistry is highly desirable; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: None